Peace

Walk a Mile in His Shoes

A Web Quest about Korea for 5th-8th Grade (Multiculturalism)

Designed by Elana Lindquist

 

Introduction | Task | Process | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits |


Introduction

Do you always get along with everyone? Do you sometimes look at people who are Asian and assume they don’t speak English? Do you sometimes look at these same people and think they must be super smart, quiet and know how to do martial arts?

In our school, there is a student who is from Korea. Although she is new to our country, her classmates don’t invite her to play with them so she feels left out. They are also jealous of her because she barely speaks English and is the top student in Math in her class. When she goes outside they stare at her. Some assume she is Chinese but never ask her where she is from.

When someone looks different from you, speaks another language, and has an Asian face, try to reach out to get to know them as a person. Find out who they are and why they are here. Get to know them by doing fun activities that are not very verbal such as playing a game, sharing a snack, showing photos of your family, or even looking at information online about their country. By learning their story you can move beyond stereotype into relationship. You cannot hate someone you love!

In honor of May 5th or Children's Day in Korea a Children's Day Peace Prize will be given to the students who develop the best plan for helping this girl and teaching the other students to be more respectful of students from Korea.


Task

You will learn to be tolerant of others who are different from you by gaining insight into Korea. You will research Korea online exploring ancient and modern Korea. You will interview a Korean person. You will create a scrapbook and a journal. Finally, you will share your findings with the other students focusing on how your new knowledge of Korea has helped you to grow more curious and less judgemental. You will share your new insights.



The Process

  • First you will be assigned to a group of 4 students.Each student will research an aspect of Korean culture, geography, traditions through holidays, written language, housing or kimchee. Then, the group will put together create a 20 page scrapbook. Begin your research at Yahoo for Kids or at Korea for Kids where you can take a virtual tour of Korea. Other sources are the cultural section in Life in Korea and Korean Postcards.

 

  • Take the virtual tour of Korea . In your group, discuss and write a description of 10 pictures. What do you think they represent? Where is it taking place? Who is in it? Where is it? Which parts show you traditional Korean culture. Which parts show you modern Korean culture?
 Discuss each one of these topics in your group. You can find the answers at the virtual tour.
  • Eating Out in a Korean Restaurant – Who is in this picture? What are they doing? What are they wearing? How does this differ from a family eating out in an American restaurant?

 

  • Kimchee is a very popular food in Korea. When do people eat it? How often? How do you make it? Here are pots for making kimchee. How does kimchee connect modern Koreans with their past? How did kimchee provide food for people to eat all year long? Is kimchee still important today?
kimchee pots

 

  • In the geography section, look at the map of Korea and make a list of problems or challenges for Korea because of its location. What do you think are the benefits and disadvantages of its location? List countries that are neighbors of Korea. Name the waters that surround it. Because of its proximity to Japan and China, what happened to Korea over history. List key events.

 

 

  • What is the significance of rocks in Korean culture? Divine Stone Pileswere thought to protect people from evil? Today what protects people from evil? What does this tell you about life in the past and what was important for Korea?

 

 

  • Korean Alphabet-Hangul Day is October 9th. It celebrates the alphabet which was invented by King Sejong. What is the significance of this alphabet? Prior to this invention, how did educated people write and read in Korea? What do you think are the benefits for Korea of educating its people in its own spoken language? How did this written language make Korea one of the most educated country in the world.You can learn more about the Korean Language at Life in Korea.

 

  • Housing Here is a traditional Korean home – Describe it. How was life organized.Most people in Korea live in apartment buildings. Compare/contrast life today and life in the past.
  • Traditional Korean Home /Modern Korean Homes in Seoul

  • What is the significance of a child's first birthday? Why did families make such a fuss about a child turning one? Does a child's first birthday have the same meaning today?

 

  • Interview a Korean person in your community. List 10 facts you learned about them.
  • Keep a daily reflection journal to describe your feelings, impressions, questions,and comments as you research your culture. On the first page, write down all your ideas about Korea before you begin this project .On the last page, write how doing this has changed your understanding of the Korean people as well as how you will now look at people who wear traditional clothing.

Your group will present to the class what they learned from their research, what suggestions they have for preventing other students from making fun of children who look different from them. They will share their best tips for getting to know a student from another culture.

Finally, the students will vote on the group that has the best solutions for promoting peace and respect in your classroom. This group will get a Children's Day Peace Prize.


Evaluation

Students will receive a group grade for their scrapbook. They will receive an individual grade for their journals. The class will vote on the group that changed their perceptions the most about India from this activity.This group will get the Children's Day Peace Prize.

Beginning

1

Developing

2

Accomplished

3

Exemplary

4

Score

 

Scrap- book

of pictures

of Korea

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance.

 

Journal

 

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance.



Conclusion

Korean Children's Day

"Children are the future of our nation. Let's show respect for children. Children who grow up with ridicule and contempt from others will become people who disrespect others, while children who grow up with respect from others will become people who respect others in turn." - Pang Chong-Hwan, founder of Korean Children's Day



Credits & References

Elana Lindquist is an English as a Second Language teacher as well as an artist and writer. She worked at the United Nations as a multilingual tour guide where she learned that peace begins inside of herself. Each person is responsible for the world he or she is living in. Only by educating our children about peace and teaching our children about peace and conflict resolution, can we build a world where we are all safe.This site is sponsored by Simply Beautiful Art.

 To contact Elana

Based on a template from The WebQuest Page